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Greece’s “dirty” secret plan for growth

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At the May 24th Eurogroup meeting, Euclid Tsakalotos presented Greece’s growth strategy to his fellow finance ministers of the euro area. A national development strategy covering the major economic sectors, which has so far eluded the public eye....

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Hydrocarbon frenzy in Greece

Iconic and ecologically sensitive marine and coastal areas are at serious risk by the ongoing oil and gas exploitation frenzy currently pushed by the Greek Government. Last week, Environment and Energy Minister Giorgos Stathakis submitted to Parliament for approval three bills ratifying contracts for hydrocarbon research and extraction in the offs...

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EU pushes Greece towards longer coal dependence

In a letter to the representatives of the institutions supervising Greece’s economy, WWF Greece raises serious concerns that the European Commission and the International Monetary Fund push the cash-strapped country towards further expanding its dependency on lignite. In the letter dated 10 November 2017, WWF Greece’s CEO Demetres Karavellas ex...

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Survey: Europeans want more EU action on environmental protection

Two-thirds of EU citizens would like the European Union to intervene more than at present in order to protect the environment, according to a Eurobarometer Survey for the European Parliament issued in April 2017. In this survey, the environment ranks third in the list of areas calling for more EU action, after terrorism and unemployment. In the sam...

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Dangerous illegal landfill in the sea turtle National Marine Park of Zakynthos island opens again

The streets of Zakynthos are filled with garbage, as local authority tries to bury municipal waste in landfill illegally operating within the sea turtle Caretta caretta national park and ignores the need for a new and safe sanitary waste disposal site.  Zakynthos is a popular tourist destination in Greece with thousands of tourists arriving to e...

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November 2013 editorial

In its original meaning of the Greek word κρίσις, a crisis is not just about a dramatic state of affairs, but also about judgment and choice. Gloom and decision are the two faces of the same coin. The current crisis is indeed leaving a heavy footprint on both nature and society. But it should also be viewed as a call for decisive action.

This past month has revealed serious challenges to the EU’s corpus of green policies and reluctance for truly sustainable ways out of the crisis.

The Multi-Annual Framework for the period 2014-2020 that received its final approval by the European Parliament is in essence an environmental and social austerity budget. In the UK, David Cameron’s administration is retreating from its promise “to lead the greenest government ever” and fears grow that important nature legislation will be undermined. In Spain, the oil drilling frenzy is threatening iconic biodiversity hotspots in the Canaries. Unfortunately, this environmental rollback does not only concern the EU: the failure of the COP19 of the UN’s Climate Change Convention to substantially speed up retarded international action on climate change, coupled with the refusal of Canada and Australia to provide developing nations with financial support that will help them cope with climate change, makes it clear that the crisis is now a global excuse for no change to the dominant dirty economic paradigm.

The most accountable promise for a living future comes from civil society: environmental groups and thousands of alarmed citizens protest against policies and plans that undermine Europe’s natural treasury and demand smart and sustainable policies that will set the foundations for living economies.

Theodota Nantsou, WWF Greece & Isabella Pratesi, WWF Italy

Last modified onSunday, 02 February 2014 18:51
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